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Radiators

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The Home Wizard app calculates your ideal home care program to avoid problems with your Radiators, but sometimes trouble can still occur. Here are answers to questions about radiator pressure reducing valve.

QUESTION FROM Tony

Hi - I've been told that my heating system required a new pressure reducing valve that seems to be causing a water pressure in th eboiler aroung 20-25 PSI. Do you think this is the the most probably cause of my problem in boiler....and do you need to drain the the boiler and/or radiators when you replace this presssure reliefe valve. Thank you

ANSWER FROM HOME-WIZARD

Dear Tony:

Yes, a problem with your pressure reducing valve could be the reason why your boiler pressure is running too high. And regarding whether you need to completely drain your boiler and radiators to replace your pressure reducing valve, it will depend on how your piping is configured, and whether you can closed valves that will allow you to isolate your pressure reducing valve from the rest of your system. If you can isolate it, this will be much better, because if you have to completely refill your system, you will likely need to purge a lot of air out (as the water heats up).

Hope this is helpful.
Home-Wizard.com

QUESTION FROM Ken

Hi I have to replace my steam radiator air valve. The air valve I have is shape like a long cylinder but the one I have to replace it with is shape like a bullet. My question does the shape make a different in the way steam will run through my house or is it that different brand make the air valve in different shapes?

ANSWER FROM HOME-WIZARD

Dear Ken:

Are you refering to your steam radiator "air" valve which is located near the top of the radiator, or do you mean your steam radiator "pressure reducing" valve which is typically located near your boiler?

Home-Wizard.com

FOLLOW-UP FROM Ken

The steam radiator "pressure reducing" valve which is typically located my boiler

FOLLOW-UP FROM Ken

"More information to my question" The steam radiator "pressure reducing" valve which is located near my boiler in the basement I think this is what I was referring to it is located on the top of a pipe near the boiler and you can hear it let air out from time to time . I hope I was able to explain it better to you the part seems to go by few different name Air Valve,steam radiator valve etc..

ANSWER FROM HOME-WIZARD

Dear Ken:

Yes, you are correct, the pressure-reducing valve is also called the “automatic make-up valve” or the “feed-water pressure regulator”. The pressure-reducing valve connects the house plumbing supply system to the boiler water. It is designed to automatically maintain an adequate amount of water in the boiler at the desired pressure (12 to 15 psi).

The pressure-reducing valve can also be part of an assembly that includes a pressure-relief valve. Some types of pressure-reducing valves have a check-valve inside of them that prevents water flowing back from the heating system into the plumbing system, and as such, it acts as a backflow preventer. Note however that some towns require the backflow preventer to be separate.

Since it sounds like your new pressure-reducing valve is significantly smaller than your previous one, I’m wondering if the one that you replaced was also a pressure-relief valve or had a check-valve inside of it. If this is the case, then your system could now be potentially operating without either a pressure-relief valve or a backflow preventer. This is not good, and it NEEDS TO BE VERIFIED AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. If you no longer have a pressure-relief valve or backflow preventer in your system, then you could potentially over-pressure your system or have heating system water flowing into your household drinking water.

Hope this is helpful.
Home-Wizard.com